Work and Travel

Special Digital Nomad Visa for Monserrat

With its population of only 5,000 people, you will definitely stand out in the crowd as a digital nomad working from the British Overseas Territory of Monserrat. But with the brand new Digital Nomad Visa in place, it might be worth the while. 

Monserrat is a small volcanic Caribbean Island, part of the lesser Caribbean Island. The 26 km long and 11 km wide island has approximately 40km of coastline.

After the COVID pandemic, the Emerald Isle of the Caribean has implemented a new one-year visa for digital nomads to boost the island’s economy and tourism.

A special Digital Nomad Workers Stamp offers you all freedom to work on this small island

The new visa program was launched in April 2021 and is called the Remote Workers Stamp. It offers the best of both worlds when it comes to vacation and remote work stay.  Like the Mediterranean island of Malta, Monserrat would like the island to become a digital nomad hub.

The underneath goal of this flexible Digital Nomad Visa is that the government hopes you fall in love with this quiet island, its great combination of connectivity and nature and that you will stay, become a resident and buy a property. All this to boost the economy.

While the initial project the visa required a minimum stay of 2 months, now, 2022, that 2 months requirement has been canceled, you can stay whatever period you like, up to a year.

Monserrat cultural heritage is an inspiring combination

Monserrat is proud of its Irish-African heritage and the music born from that heritage is part of daily life among the friendly islanders known as Montserratians. For the rest, the island does not offer much. A lot of limitations due to its geographic position and size.

This special mix is also to be found in the cuisine. A blend of African and Irish dishes with the best of both worlds combined in spices and preparations has inspired the Islanders’  way of cooking traditional meals like Goat Water. Don’t be mistaken by the name, Goat Water is actually a stew. It combines flavors like thyme and green pepper, garlic, and marjoram after hours of simmering in a traditional Antiguan dish.

A volcanic Island with a recent history of eruptions

In many ways, the island is not only recovering from the recent pandemic, which did not hit very hard on the island due to its remote location, but it is also still recovering from a recent series of volcanic eruptions that began in 1995, the blasts from the Soufrière Hills volcano covered the island’s southern half in ash. Today, the island’s population is half what it was pre-eruption because many Islanders fled and were relocated in the UK.

Sustainable tourism

The paradise feel of nature and the quiet pace make up for the small size of the island. That is the strong belief of the Monserrat board of tourism. For nomads and remote workers that like a bit of peace and quiet and seclusion, the island can be heaven. This is in great contrast with other Caribbean Islands that experienced a tourism boom in the past few years.

The island has a huge input in sustainability and eco-tourism. Lots of activities to explore nature and preserve it and for the future, the island will be rolling out a tourist-focused environmental program that will showcase its highland ecosystems, birdwatching, and volcano viewing.

Before you go do check a few things!

The island ferry was down due to COVID. So there was no sea transport between Antigua and other islands. Air traffic never stopped and charter flights were available.

Up till recently, word was that only fully vaccinated people were allowed to travel to Monserrat. And they had to quarantine for 5 days. But with COVID regulations changing on a daily base worldwide, this might have changed also, same with the ferries.

For ferry schedules, you click here 

For air transport, you click here

Are you working from Monserrat? Please share your nomad experiences below in the comment section. I am very curious to find out how it is. 

 

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* Photo found on Google Images, Gannett CDN who credits Monserrat board of Tourism for this photo.

Jeanette, a Dutch female nomad, started to travel the world at the age of 17. Walker of beaches, shell searcher, and iPhone photographer. Always horizon bound preferably on a motorcycle. Currently, she lives in a desert village in Baja California Sur in Mexico. She is an emigration coach and works online.