Work and Travel

Why remote working from Mexico is popular

From 2020 onwards lots of remote workers and digital nomads found their way into Mexico. Mainly due to the easy entry regulations during the pandemic. 

Mexico suddenly become even hotter than it already was for people from all over the world. The sunny beaches of the Riviera Maya in Quintana Roo were by far the most popular destination. But also more remote places like Oaxaca, Puerto Escondido, and San Cristobal de Las Casas became vast moving hotspots and hubs to flock together and work. (read also: Motorcycle Road Trip Mexico part 5, San Cristobal de las Casas)

And although Mexico did have a bunch of Covid-related rules, it was clear to everyone what those rules were and how to abide by them.

And although the world has opened up more and more the influx of remote workers has not stopped. And that is understandable. With fast reliable internet at your fingertips, Mexico makes a great nomad hub.

Mexico is a fun place to work from, but you have to find your “spot”

Because tourism never really stopped during the great lockdown, inflation is not as bad as elsewhere.

While the pandemic forced us to look differently at workspace and client contacts many people do not have to return to the office and are allowed to work from home, connecting digitally with the company for meetings and client appointments.

And freelancers even more so. No need to go to network meetings to find your peers or useful connections, all those meetings are now happening in Zoom.

So when the world worked from home instead of the office, many combined that with an escape to a more pleasant lifestyle, like working from a rural environment, moving to the countryside, and even moving abroad. And many found their way to Mexico.

What makes Mexico so popular?

Well, for one thing, the good weather, fast internet, and fun coffee shops to work from. The excellent short-term office rental facilities and nomad hubs. The easy living hostel life, the most amazing Airbnbs spread all over the country, and then for some the alcohol prices and party zones.

The daily living expenses here are rather low compared to many other countries, and there is no shortage of houses to rent. And you can easily live for 1000US$ and have a blast. (Also read: I live in Mexico on 1000 euros a month!)

Combine that with easy visa rules or even temporary resident permits if you want to stay much longer than a tourist visa allows, you can relax without worrying too much about visa runs and extensions.(About visa read:  Is the FMM the same as a visa in Mexico?)

Travel within Mexico is well organized and affordable. There are daily departing long-distance busses that take you in a few hours halfway across the country and domestic flights are plenty.

What are some fun destinations to work from in Mexico if you do not want to end up in the cliche tourist areas?

Planning on renting a car in Mexico and going on a road trip yourself? Check out this website and download GPX files. 

 

Jeanette, a Dutch female nomad, started to travel the world at the age of 17. Walker of beaches, shell searcher, and iPhone photographer. Always horizon bound preferably on a motorcycle. Currently, she lives in a desert village in Baja California Sur in Mexico. She is an emigration coach and works online.